News

ACEA calls for support over safety legislation

ACEA calls for support over safety legislation

Ahead of the key European Parliament vote on the update of the General Safety Regulation, which governs the safety systems to be included in new vehicle types, the European Automobile Manufacturers' Association (ACEA) has called for a rapid adoption of this important piece of legislation.

ACEA secretary general, Erik Jonnaert said, 'The European auto industry is committed to play its role in continuing to reduce road accidents and fatalities. In this context, we welcome the revision of the General Safety Regulation and support a wide array of the safety measures proposed by the European Commission last May.'

These include the requirement that all new car types come equipped with autonomous emergency braking (AEB) systems, which start braking manoeuvres automatically if a collision is imminent and the driver is not taking any action to avoid it. Other measures supported by the industry include drowsiness and attention detection systems, reversing detection for cars and vans, emergency stop signals, and lane departure warning systems.

Several of these safety technologies have the advantage of addressing multiple types of accidents simultaneously. For instance, accidents related to distraction can also be reduced by AEB and lane departure warning systems. Similarly, AEB will also prevent or reduce the severity of frontal and side crashes, reducing the need for additional measures to address this type of accident.

'We call upon MEPs to take these synergies into account,' said Erik.

ACEA believes that some of the measures proposed by the Commission require further review to ensure a focus on the technologies with the strongest positive outcomes. Regarding vision-related accidents with trucks for instance, a data that the use of cameras and sensors to increase the driver's field of vision and to draw attention to the critical area is some 50% more effective in reducing fatalities than re-designing trucks with low-entry cabs.

For all measures under consideration, MEPs should align the introduction time with product development time, allowing at least three years for new vehicle types from the date the regulation has entered into force.

Erik added, 'While we believe in the huge potential of vehicle safety technology, by itself it will never suffice. We are therefore calling on policy makers to adopt a truly integrated approach to road safety; combining new vehicle technology with better road infrastructure and safer driver behaviour.'

Filed Under

We have placed cookies on your device to give you the best possible experience. By continuing to browse our site, you agree to our use of cookies. To find out more, please refer to our Privacy Policy

×

Find an Engineer

To find an engineer please enter your postcode below

Enter Postcode

Search
Assessor Mag
Assessor Logo

The members magazine of the IAEA.

Published bi-monthly, it covers news, features, case studies, interviews and reports from IAEA meetings across the country to keep members up-to-date with what's happening around the industry. You can read the latest issue online, and also access previous editions by clicking on the relevant links.

Assessor Magazine
Footer Logo

Subscribe to our mailing list

Subscribe

Terms & Conditions | Privacy Policy
copyright 2016 The Institute of Automotive Engineer Assessors